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Showing posts from August 2, 2017

Having a Humble Opinion of Self

Having a Humble Opinion of SelfExcerpt ‎Many words do not satisfy the soul, but a good life eases the mind and a clean conscience inspires great trust in God. ‎The more you know and the better you understand, the more severely will you be judged, unless your life is also the more holy. Do not be proud, therefore, because of your learning or skill. Rather, fear because of the talent gave you. If you think you know many things and understand them well enough, realize at the same time that there is much you do not know. Hence, do not affect wisdom, but admit your ignorance. Why prefer yourself to anyone else when many are more learned, more cultured than you? ‎If you wish to learn and appreciate something worth while, then love to be unknown and considered as nothing. … More Thomas à Kempis. The Imitation of Christ. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, 1996. Print.

Lower Than the Angels

Lower Than the AngelsExcerpt Here the LXX takes Elohim (being a plural form) to mean “angels;” as also in Ps. 97:7and 138:1. The more correct rendering of the Hebrew may be, “thou madest him a little short of God,” with reference to his having been made “in God’s image,”“after God’s likeness,” and having dominion over creation given him. But, if so, Elohim must be understood in its abstract sense of “Divinity” (so Gesenius), rather than as denoting the Supreme Being. Otherwise, “thyself” would have been the more appropriate expression, the psalm being addressed to God. The argument is not affected by the difference of translation. Indeed, the latter rendering enhances still more the position assigned to man. More Spence-Jones, H. D. M., Ed. Hebrews. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit Commentary.

Figure of the Shepherd

Figure of the ShepherdJohn 10:1–18 Excerpt The figure of the shepherd and his sheep is important in the NT. Jesus is the Good Shepherd who gives his life for the sheep (Mt 18:10–14Mk 6:34Jn 10Heb 13:20). The analogy of the shepherd and the flock finds rich expression in Psalm 23Ezekiel 34, and John 10. God was the Shepherd of Israel (Gn 49:24Pss 23:180:1Is 40:11). When unfaithful shepherds failed Israel, God intervened and appointed his servant David as a faithful shepherd over them (Ez 34:11–1623–24). The NT imagery comes from an OT and Palestinian background. In the Jewish economy, the shepherd who tended a flock of sheep or goats held a responsible position. Great flocks had to be moved from place to place, and it was necessary that they are guarded against wild animals and robbers. Because of the fundamental role of shepherding in the ancient world, the word “shepherd” became a common term for a ruler. The kings of Assyria, Babylon, and Egypt were often referred to as…

Be Humble Toward One Another

Be Humble Toward One AnotherExcerpt Humility preserves peace and order in all Christian churches and societies; pride disturbs them. Where God gives grace to be humble, he will give wisdom, faith, and holiness. To be humble, and subject to our reconciled God, will bring greater comfort to the soul than the gratification of pride and ambition. But it is to be in due time; not in thy fancied time, but God’s own wisely appointed time. Does he wait, and wilt not thou? What difficulties will not the firm belief of his wisdom, power, and goodness get over! Then be humble under his hand. Cast “all you care;” personal cares, family cares, cares for the present, and cares for the future, for yourselves, for others, for the church, on God. These are burdensome, and often very sinful, when they arise from unbelief and distrust, when they torture and distract the mind, unfit us for duties, and hinder our delight in the service of God. The remedy is, to cast our care upon God, and leave every event…

Connect the Testaments

August 2: Small Players Isaiah 2:6–4:6; Luke 1:39–66; Job 1:13–22 A priest should know better. A man representing the spiritual state of God’s people shouldn’t be so quick to question God’s promises. But for Zechariah, obedience became complicated. When the angel Gabriel told him he’d have a son, he responded with doubt: “By what will I know this? For I am an old man, and my wife is advanced in years!” (Luke 1:18). Such happy news—such unexpected goodness—deserved a glad, believing response. While Zechariah fully expected to encounter God in the temple, Mary wasn’t anticipating anything like Gabriel’s appearance. Yet she readily responded to the angel’s declaration with bold, simple allegiance: “Behold, the Lord’s female slave! May it happen to me according to your word” (Luke 1:38). Her alignment with God echoes Job’s response after he endured crippling loss: “Naked I came out from my mother’s womb, and naked I will return there. Yahweh gives, and Yahweh takes. Let Yahweh’s name be bles…

Morning and Evening

Morning, August 2Go To Evening Reading
“Who worketh all things after the counsel of his own will.” —Ephesians 1:11
Our belief in God’s wisdom supposes and necessitates that he has a settled purpose and plan in the work of salvation. What would creation have been without his design? Is there a fish in the sea, or a fowl in the air, which was left to chance for its formation? Nay, in every bone, joint, and muscle, sinew, gland, and blood-vessel, you mark the presence of a God working everything according to the design of infinite wisdom. And shall God be present in creation, ruling over all, and not in grace? Shall the new creation have the fickle genius of free will to preside over it when divine counsel rules the old creation? Look at Providence! Who knoweth not that not a sparrow falleth to the ground without your Father? Even the hairs of your head are all numbered. God weighs the mountains of our grief in scales, and the hills of our tribulation in balances. And shall there be a God i…

My Utmost for His Highest

August 2nd The discipline of difficulty In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.John 16:33. An average view of the Christian life is that it means deliverance from trouble. It is deliverance in trouble, which is very different. “He that dwelleth in the secret place of the Most High … there shall no evil befall thee”—no plague can come nigh the place where you are at one with God. If you are a child of God, there certainly will be troubles to meet, but Jesus says do not be surprised when they come. “In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world, there is nothing for you to fear.” Men who before they were saved would scorn to talk about troubles, often become ‘fushionless’ after being born again because they have a wrong idea of a saint. God does not give us overcoming life: He gives us life as we overcome. The strain is the strength. If there is no strain, there is no strength. Are you asking God to gi…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

August 2 He entered into one of the ships … and … sat down Luke 5:3 When Jesus sits in the ship everything is in its right place. The cargo is in the hold, not in the heart. Cares and gains, fears and losses, yesterday’s failure and today’s success do not thrust themselves in between us and His presence. The heart cleaves to Him. “Goodness and mercy shall follow me”, sang the Psalmist. Alas, when the goodness and mercy come before us, and our blessings shut Jesus from view! Here is the blessed order—the Lord ever first, I following Him, His goodness and mercy following me. Mark Guy Pearse

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.