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Showing posts from August 21, 2017

Beliefs of the Samaritans

Beliefs of the SamaritansJohn 4:1–45 Excerpt The main beliefs of the Samaritans demonstrate both the close affinities with and obvious divergences from mainstream Judaism. They held in common with Judaism a strong monotheistic faith in the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. In contrast, however, there was an elevating of Mt Gerizim in the north as the only holy place for sacrifice, based on several divergent passages in Deuteronomy and Exodus in the Samaritan text. Mt Gerizim came to be identified with the site of Abel’s first altar (Gn 4:4), the site of Noah’s sacrifice after the Flood (8:20), the meeting place of Abraham and Melchizedek (14:18), the site of Isaac’s intended sacrifice (ch 22), and many other associations. More Elwell, Walter A., and Philip Wesley Comfort. Tyndale Bible dictionary 2001 : 1154. Print. Tyndale Reference Library.

Route of the Exodus

Route of the ExodusExcerpt ‎The Bible contains many geographical notations in Deuteronomy, Numbers, and Exodus about the route of the Exodus. Numbers 33 gives a comprehensive listing of all the encampments, from Egypt to the Plains of Moab opposite Jericho. Yet the information provided can be interpreted in several ways, leading to different ideas about the route. Scholars have proposed three basic routes—the northern, central, and southern route theories—each based on the biblical text. Over a dozen mountains have been identified by different scholars as suitable candidates for Mount Sinai, where Moses received the Ten Commandments. Only a few sites mentioned in the Exodus have been identified with some certainty. Raamses, the point of origin, has been conclusively identified with Qantir, while the central rallying point of Kadesh-barnea seems plausibly located at Ain el-Qudeirat or one of several nearby springs. Most other identifications remain tentative. … More Brisco, Thomas V. Hol…

The Trinity

The Trinity1 Peter 1:2 Excerpt Peter laid the theological foundations for this letter of encouragement. “God” the Father in His grace had chosen them and God the “Spirit” had sanctified them through the atoning blood of God the Son, Jesus Christ.(All three Persons of the Trinity are mentioned in this verse.) Thus Peter greeted his readers with the prayerful wish that they might experience in abundance God’s grace(charis) and peace (eirēnē, equivalent of the Heb. šālôm; cf. 5:14). More Raymer, Roger M. “1 Peter.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 840. Print.

Connect the Testaments

August 21: Transitions Isaiah 42:10–43:28; Luke 16:1–17:10; Job 9:25–35 Life is marked by seasons—times of great difficulty and times of great joy. Usually we focus on making the transition from pain to relief as quickly as possible, but in the process, we may forget the significance of the transition itself. A transition is an opportunity to contemplate: Who is acting to move us from one season of our lives to the next? Why does winter give way to spring? “Sing a new song to Yahweh; praise him from the end of the earth, you who go down to the sea and that which fills it, the coastlands and their inhabitants. Let the desert and its towns lift up their voice, the villages that Kedar inhabits. Let the inhabitants of Sela sing for joy; let them shout loudly from the top of the mountains. Let them give glory to Yahweh and declare his praise in the coastlands” (Isa 42:10–12). This song of praise moves from the “end of the earth” inward, from region to region, until the whole world is involved.…

Morning and Evening

Morning, August 21Go To Evening Reading
“He that watereth shall be watered also himself.” —Proverbs 11:25
We are here taught the great lesson, that to get, we must give; that to accumulate, we must scatter; that to make ourselves happy, we must make others happy; and that in order to become spiritually vigorous, we must seek the spiritual good of others. In watering others, we are ourselves watered. How? Our efforts to be useful, bring out our powers for usefulness. We have latent talents and dormant faculties, which are brought to light by exercise. Our strength for labour is hidden even from ourselves, until we venture forth to fight the Lord’s battles, or to climb the mountains of difficulty. We do not know what tender sympathies we possess until we try to dry the widow’s tears, and soothe the orphan’s grief. We often find in attempting to teach others, that we gain instruction for ourselves. Oh, what gracious lessons some of us have learned at sick beds! We went to teach the Scriptur…

My Utmost for His Highest

August 21st The ministry of the unnoticed Blessed are the poor in spirit. Matthew 5:3. The New Testament notices things which from our standards do not seem to count. “Blessed are the poor in spirit,” literally—Blessed are the paupers—an exceedingly commonplace thing! The preaching of to-day is apt to emphasize strength of will, beauty of character—the things that are easily noticed. The phrase we hear so often, ‘Decide for Christ,’ is an emphasis on something Our Lord never trusted. He never asks us to decide for Him, but to yield to Him, a very different thing. At the basis of Jesus Christ’s Kingdom is the unaffected loveliness of the commonplace. The thing I am blessed in is my poverty. If I know I have no strength of will, no nobility of disposition, then Jesus says—Blessed are you, because it is through this poverty that I enter His Kingdom. I cannot enter His Kingdom as a good man or woman, I can only enter it as a complete pauper. The true character of the loveliness that tells for…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

August 21 We are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them Eph. 2:10 No man is born into the world whose work is not born with him. There is always work, and tools to work withal, for those who will. J. R. Lowell

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.