Catholic Daily Readings


TUESDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Catholic Daily Readings
First Reading Ro 8:18–25
Response Ps 126:3a
Gospel Acclamation Mt 11:25
Gospel Lk 13:18–21

Lutheran Service Book Three Year Lectionary

REFORMATION DAY

Lutheran Service Book Three Year Lectionary
First Reading Re 14:6–7
Psalm Ps 46
Epistle Ro 3:19–28

Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings

TUESDAY AFTER PROPER 25

Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings
First Reading Dt 10:10–22 or Ex 34:29–35
Second Reading Jas 2:14–26

Book of Common Prayer (1928) Daily Office Lectionary

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK AFTER TRINITY, MORNING PRAYER

Book of Common Prayer (1928) Daily Office Lectionary
Psalm Ps 125126
First Reading 2 Ki 4:18–25a
Second Reading 1 Ti 4:6

The Mount of Olives

The Mount of Olives

Excerpt
The Mt of Olives gained its name from its extensive olive groves, which were renowned in antiquity (Zec 14:4Mk 11:1). Its western face collects rainfall from the Mediterranean, which, together with decomposed limestone, makes for fertile orchards. The eastern side marks the boundary of the arid Judean wilderness. Bethany and Bethphage are two NT villages hugging these eastern slopes. ...
During his final week, Jesus taught on the Mt of Olives (Mk 13) and spent his evenings there (Lk 21:37, although this may refer to Bethany). Following the Last Supper, Jesus came to this mountain for prayer (Mk 14:26). In a garden near an olive oil press (“Gethsemane”), he was arrested (v 32). The final event of Christ on earth, his ascension, was viewed from the mount by his followers (Acts 1:12). More
Elwell, Walter A., and Philip Wesley Comfort. Tyndale Bible dictionary 2001 : 975. Print. Tyndale Reference Library.

Patmos, the Place of Exile

Patmos, the Place of Exile

Excerpt
In Revelation 1:9 John says that he was on the island of Patmos “on account of the word of God and the testimony of Jesus.” He also indicates that he is a fellow participant in their “tribulations.” The Roman historian Tacitus informs us that the Romans used some of the Aegean islands as places of banishment and exile during the 1st century (Annals, 3:68; 4:30; 15:71). Thus the language of the author and the evidence of Tacitus, joined to Christian traditions from the 2nd and 3rd centuries about John’s banishment, support the likelihood that Patmos was a place of exile or political confinement. More
Elwell, Walter A., and Barry J. Beitzel. “Patmos.” Baker encyclopedia of the Bible1988 : 1620. Print.

The Mission of the Son

The Mission of the Son

Excerpt
But what law could not do, God did by sending his very own Son with a nature that resembled our sinful nature. He came in the “likeness of sinful man.”124 If Christ had not taken on our nature, he could not have been one of us. On the other hand, had he become completely like us (i.e., had he sinned), he could not have become our Savior. Barrett translates “in the form of flesh which had passed under sin’s rule,” which means that “Christ took precisely the same fallen nature that we ourselves have, and that he remained sinless because he constantly overcame a proclivity to sin.”125 His mission was to put an end to sin, to condemn that evil power that has, since the dawn of history, held the human race in bondage. Knox says that God “signed the death warrant of sin.” More
Mounce, Robert H. Romans. Vol. 27. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1995. Print. The New American Commentary.

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

October 1
At Jesus’ feet
Luke 10:39
At Jesus’ feet—that is our place of privilege and of blessing, and here it is that we are to be educated and fitted for the practical duties of life. Here we are to renew our strength while we wait on Him, and to learn how to mount on wings as eagles; and here we are to become possessed of that true knowledge which is power. Here we are to learn how real work is to be done, and to be armed with the true motive power to do it. Here we are to find solace amid both the trials of work—and they are not few—and the trials of life in general; and here we are to anticipate something of the blessedness of heaven amidst the days of earth; for to sit at His feet is indeed to be in heavenly places, and to gaze upon His glory is to do what we shall never tire of doing yonder.
W. Hay Aitken


 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Morning and Evening

Morning, October 31 Go To Evening Reading

“Renew a right spirit within me.”
Psalm 51:10

A backslider, if there be a spark of life left in him will groan after restoration. In this renewal the same exercise of grace is required as at our conversion. We needed repentance then; we certainly need it now. We wanted faith that we might come to Christ at first; only the like grace can bring us to Jesus now. We wanted a word from the Most High, a word from the lip of the loving One, to end our fears then; we shall soon discover, when under a sense of present sin, that we need it now. No man can be renewed without as real and true a manifestation of the Holy Spirit’s energy as he felt at first, because the work is as great, and flesh and blood are as much in the way now as ever they were. Let thy personal weakness, O Christian, be an argument to make thee pray earnestly to thy God for help. Remember, David when he felt himself to be powerless, did not fold his arms or close his lips, but he hastened to the mercy-seat with “renew a right spirit within me.” Let not the doctrine that you, unaided, can do nothing, make you sleep; but let it be a goad in your side to drive you with an awful earnestness to Israel’s strong Helper. O that you may have grace to plead with God, as though you pleaded for your very life—“Lord, renew a right spirit within me.” He who sincerely prays to God to do this, will prove his honesty by using the means through which God works. Be much in prayer; live much upon the Word of God; kill the lusts which have driven your Lord from you; be careful to watch over the future uprisings of sin. The Lord has his own appointed ways; sit by the wayside and you will be ready when he passes by. Continue in all those blessed ordinances which will foster and nourish your dying graces; and, knowing that all the power must proceed from him, cease not to cry, “Renew a right spirit within me.”

Go To Morning Reading Evening, October 31

“I did know thee in the wilderness, in the land of great drought.”
Hosea 13:5

Yes, Lord, thou didst indeed know me in my fallen state, and thou didst even then choose me for thyself. When I was loathsome and self-abhorred, thou didst receive me as thy child, and thou didst satisfy my craving wants. Blessed for ever be thy name for this free, rich, abounding mercy. Since then, my inward experience has often been a wilderness; but thou hast owned me still as thy beloved, and poured streams of love and grace into me to gladden me, and make me fruitful. Yea, when my outward circumstances have been at the worst, and I have wandered in a land of drought, thy sweet presence has solaced me. Men have not known me when scorn has awaited me, but thou hast known my soul in adversities, for no affliction dims the lustre of thy love. Most gracious Lord, I magnify thee for all thy faithfulness to me in trying circumstances, and I deplore that I should at any time have forgotten thee and been exalted in heart, when I have owed all to thy gentleness and love. Have mercy upon thy servant in this thing!

My soul, if Jesus thus acknowledged thee in thy low estate, be sure that thou own both himself and his cause now that thou art in thy prosperity. Be not lifted up by thy worldly successes so as to be ashamed of the truth or of the poor church with which thou hast been associated. Follow Jesus into the wilderness: bear the cross with him when the heat of persecution grows hot. He owned thee, O my soul, in thy poverty and shame—never be so treacherous as to be ashamed of him. O for more shame at the thought of being ashamed of my best Beloved! Jesus, my soul cleaveth to thee.

“I’ll turn to thee in days of light,
As well as nights of care,
Thou brightest amid all that’s bright!
Thou fairest of the fair!”


 Spurgeon, C. H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings. London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1896. Print.

Connect the Testaments

October 31: Speaking the Truth
Daniel 11:1–12:12; 2 Thessalonians 3:1–18; Job 42:10–17
“And now I will reveal the truth to you” (Dan 11:2). How much better would our world be if more of us were willing to take this kind of stand—to make these kinds of statements?
The truth Daniel refers to are the prophecies foretelling what will happen in the Persian Empire. Great power and wealth are coming, and with them comes the fear of how that power and wealth may be used. If we read between the lines of the prophet’s statements in Dan 11, we can feel the trepidation. He is concerned that wickedness will once again sweep over the land.
Such was the case for Paul: “Pray for us, that the word of the Lord may progress and be honored … and that we may be delivered from evil and wicked people, for not all have the faith” (2 Thess 3:1–2). Paul was aware that unbelievers would seek his life. He wasn’t sure what the future would look like. We can imagine the fear that he must have felt, wondering, “What is next? What is coming? Who is my friend? Who is my enemy?”
If you have ever been in a situation where it seems you have more enemies than friends, you know that speaking the truth becomes increasingly difficult over time. The prophecies in Dan 11 suggest a time like this, and Paul’s words tell us that life for the early Christians was uncertain. Many Christians today lead relatively safe and easy lives. For Christians in some parts of the world, though, Paul’s situation is far too familiar. But no matter our present situation, we must boldly speak the truth.
What is God asking you to say?
John D. Barry


 Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.

My Utmost for His Highest

October 31st
Discernment of faith
Faith as a grain of mustard seed.… Matthew 17:20
We have the idea that God rewards us for our faith, it may be so in the initial stages; but we do not earn anything by faith. Faith brings us into right relationship with God and gives God His opportunity. God has frequently to knock the bottom board out of your experience if you are a saint in order to get you into contact with Himself. God wants you to understand that it is a life of faith, not a life of sentimental enjoyment of His blessings. Your earlier life of faith was narrow and intense, settled around a little sun-spot of experience that had as much of sense as of faith in it, full of light and sweetness; then God withdrew His conscious blessings in order to teach you to walk by faith. You are worth far more to Him now than you were in your days of conscious delight and thrilling testimony.
Faith by its very nature must be tried, and the real trial of faith is not that we find it difficult to trust God, but that God’s character has to be cleared in our own minds. Faith in its actual working out has to go through spells of unsyllabled isolation. Never confound the trial of faith with the ordinary discipline of life. Much that we call the trial of faith is the inevitable result of being alive. Faith in the Bible is faith in God against every thing that contradicts Him—‘I will remain true to God’s character whatever He may do.’ “Though He slay me, yet will I trust Him”—this is the most sublime utterance of faith in the whole of the Bible.


 Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year. Grand Rapids, MI: Oswald Chambers Publications; Marshall Pickering, 1986. Print.