Lectionary Devotions


Today
Catholic Daily Readings
First Reading Eze 37:21–28
Response Je 31:10d
Gospel Acclamation Eze 18:31
Gospel Jn 11:45–56

Today
Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings
First Reading Je 33:10–16
Second Reading Mk 10:32–3446–52

Today
Book of Common Prayer (1979) Daily Office Lectionary
Psalms (Morning) Ps 137:1–67–9Ps 144
Psalms (Evening) Ps 4243
Old Testament Ex 10:21–11:8
New Testament 2 Co 4:13–18
Gospel Mk 10:46–52

Today
Book of Common Prayer (1928) Daily Office Lectionary
Psalm Ps 147
First Reading Ex 12:29–3942
Second Reading 1 Co 16:15


The KJV Commentary International Sunday school Lesson Outline

 March 24
Lesson 4
The Lord’s Supper
Devotional Reading: 1 Corinthians 10:14–22
Background Scripture: Luke 22:1–38
Luke 22:14–30
14 And when the hour was come, he sat down, and the twelve apostles with him.
15 And he said unto them, With desire I have desired to eat this passover with you before I suffer:
16 For I say unto you, I will not any more eat thereof, until it be fulfilled in the kingdom of God.
17 And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and said, Take this, and divide it among yourselves:
18 For I say unto you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine, until the kingdom of God shall come.
19 And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.
20 Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood, which is shed for you.
21 But, behold, the hand of him that betrayeth me is with me on the table.
22 And truly the Son of man goeth, as it was determined: but woe unto that man by whom he is betrayed!
23 And they began to enquire among themselves, which of them it was that should do this thing.
24 And there was also a strife among them, which of them should be accounted the greatest.
25 And he said unto them, The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and they that exercise authority upon them are called benefactors.
26 But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.
27 For whether is greater, he that sitteth at meat, or he that serveth? is not he that sitteth at meat? but I am among you as he that serveth.
28 Ye are they which have continued with me in my temptations.
29 And I appoint unto you a kingdom, as my Father hath appointed unto me;
30 That ye may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom, and sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel.
Key Verse
He that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.—Luke 22:26b
Undying Hope
Unit 2: Resurrection Hope
Lessons 4–9
Lesson Aims
After participating in this lesson, each student will be able to:
1. Retell the events of the instituting of the Lord’s Supper.
2. Note the irony of the disciples’ dispute about who was the greatest as juxtaposed against Jesus’ words about His impending sacrifice.
3. Confess that he or she sometimes focuses on self even in the midst of worship events that focus on Christ.
Lesson Outline
Introduction
A. Last SupperLord’s Supper
B. Lesson Background
I. Somber Celebration (Luke 22:14–20)
A. Last Passover (vv. 14–16)
B. Last Cup (vv. 17, 18)
C. Last Loaf (v. 19)
D. New Covenant (v. 20)
II. Sobering Prediction (Luke 22:21–30)
A. Hand of Betrayal (vv. 21, 22)
Famous (or Infamous) Traitors
B. Head of Boasting (vv. 23, 24)
“Getting It”—or Not!
C. Heart of Service (vv. 25–27)
D. Honor of Faithfulness (vv. 28–30)
Conclusion
A. Remembering
B. Prayer
C. Thought to Remember
___________________________
What Do You Think?
How can we keep the Lord’s Supper from becoming a source of division rather than unity?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
Differences in doctrinal interpretation
Undue focus on accessories
Entrenched traditions
Other
___________________________
What Do You Think?
Besides this do in remembrance of me, what would be some good inscriptions for Communion tables?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
Matthew 26:2627
Mark 14:24
Luke 22:17
Acts 2:42
1 Corinthians 11:26
Other
___________________________
What Do You Think?
What are some ways people betray Jesus today? How do you protect yourself from doing so?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
In thought life
In the workplace
In entertainment choices
“Don’t assume you are the good soil [of Luke 8:15]” (Francis Chan, Crazy Love).
Other
___________________________
What Do You Think?
Is there any place for a competitive spirit within the church? Why, or why not?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
1 Corinthians 11:19
Philippians 2:3
Hebrews 10:24
Other?
___________________________
What Do You Think?
When was a time you were surprised to be blessed as you served someone else?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
In a benevolence setting
In a teaching setting
In a counseling setting
Other
___________________________
Visual for Lesson 4As you study verse 19, point to this visual and ask, “How can we better prepare ourselves for observing the Lord’s Supper?”


 Nickelson, Ronald L., and Jonathan Underwood, eds. The KJV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2012–2013. Vol. 60. Cincinnati, OH: Standard, 2012. Print.

Connect the Testaments

March 24: Green Pastures: They Require Action
Numbers 28:1–31; 1 Corinthians 10:23–11:16; Psalm 23
Love and complete reliance on God are interrelated concepts. When we discover what love really means, we want to praise God for it. When we learn to rely on God for all our needs, we see just how loving He is as He takes care of all aspects of our lives. And this love makes us want to show love to others.
It’s those who don’t have who are most apt to come to Jesus. They’re most in need of love. For this reason, it’s hard for us who do have—a home, a car, enough food for a week—to fully understand reliance on Christ. It takes a different type of discipline.
This is why it’s still shocking to me how many people absolutely love Psa 23. It’s comforting, I suppose, and that’s why: “Yahweh is my shepherd; I will not lack for anything. In grassy pastures he makes me lie down; by quiet waters he leads me” (Psa 23:1–2). I think so many of us love it, though, because we’re aware of how frail and vulnerable we really are. It could all be gone in a moment. Disease catches up to us, and death will eventually get us all. We often forget just how important love is in all this, and we fail to recognize why Psa 23 has a special place in our hearts.
We are in the top percentile of wealth in the world. Many of our families own more than one car. Nonetheless, the death around us and the diseases we see show just how quickly it can be gone. And for this reason, we can recognize how crucial love is. Love carries people through hard times. It brings them to depend on God. Paul tells us we could have all sorts of incredible spiritual gifts, but if we don’t have love, there’s no point (1 Cor 13:1, 13).
And when Paul speaks about love, he’s not talking about something we say or even feel; he’s talking about something we do. Love requires us to give all things; or in Paul’s words, it “rejoices with the truth, bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things” (1 Cor 13:6–7). So, those of us who understand relying on Psa 23, even in our wealth, must help those who rely on its promises but are yet to experience them. They are people all over the world, waiting for us to “bear” their burdens with them. They are the hurting, the voiceless—the people who need us to show real love.
How can you show love to the hurting and voiceless in the world today? God has called us all to action—that is what love means. So how will you act?
John D. Barry


 Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.

Morning and Evening

Morning, March 24 Go To Evening Reading

“He was heard in that he feared.”
Hebrews 5:7

Did this fear arise from the infernal suggestion that he was utterly forsaken. There may be sterner trials than this, but surely it is one of the worst to be utterly forsaken? “See,” said Satan, “thou hast a friend nowhere! Thy Father hath shut up the bowels of his compassion against thee. Not an angel in his courts will stretch out his hand to help thee. All heaven is alienated from thee; thou art left alone. See the companions with whom thou hast taken sweet counsel, what are they worth? Son of Mary, see there thy brother James, see there thy loved disciple John, and thy bold apostle Peter, how the cowards sleep when thou art in thy sufferings! Lo! Thou hast no friend left in heaven or earth. All hell is against thee. I have stirred up mine infernal den. I have sent my missives throughout all regions summoning every prince of darkness to set upon thee this night, and we will spare no arrows, we will use all our infernal might to overwhelm thee: and what wilt thou do, thou solitary one?” It may be, this was the temptation; we think it was, because the appearance of an angel unto him strengthening him removed that fear. He was heard in that he feared; he was no more alone, but heaven was with him. It may be that this is the reason of his coming three times to his disciples—as Hart puts it—

“Backwards and forwards thrice he ran,
As if he sought some help from man.”

He would see for himself whether it were really true that all men had forsaken him; he found them all asleep; but perhaps he gained some faint comfort from the thought that they were sleeping, not from treachery, but from sorrow, the spirit indeed was willing, but the flesh was weak. At any rate, he was heard in that he feared. Jesus was heard in his deepest woe; my soul, thou shalt be heard also.

Go To Morning Reading Evening, March 24

“In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit.”
Luke 10:21

The Saviour was “a man of sorrows,” but every thoughtful mind has discovered the fact that down deep in his innermost soul he carried an inexhaustible treasury of refined and heavenly joy. Of all the human race, there was never a man who had a deeper, purer, or more abiding peace than our Lord Jesus Christ. “He was anointed with the oil of gladness above his fellows.” His vast benevolence must, from the very nature of things, have afforded him the deepest possible delight, for benevolence is joy. There were a few remarkable seasons when this joy manifested itself. “At that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth.” Christ had his songs, though it was night with him; though his face was marred, and his countenance had lost the lustre of earthly happiness, yet sometimes it was lit up with a matchless splendour of unparalleled satisfaction, as he thought upon the recompense of the reward, and in the midst of the congregation sang his praise unto God. In this, the Lord Jesus is a blessed picture of his church on earth. At this hour the church expects to walk in sympathy with her Lord along a thorny road; through much tribulation she is forcing her way to the crown. To bear the cross is her office, and to be scorned and counted an alien by her mother’s children is her lot; and yet the church has a deep well of joy, of which none can drink but her own children. There are stores of wine, and oil, and corn, hidden in the midst of our Jerusalem, upon which the saints of God are evermore sustained and nurtured; and sometimes, as in our Saviour’s case, we have our seasons of intense delight, for “There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of our God.” Exiles though we be, we rejoice in our King; yea, in him we exceedingly rejoice, while in his name we set up our banners.


 Spurgeon, C. H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings. London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1896. Print.

My Utmost for His Highest

March 24th
Decreasing into his purpose
He must increase, but I must decrease. John 3:30.
If you become a necessity to a soul, you are out of God’s order. As a worker, your great responsibility is to be a friend of the Bridegroom. When once you see a soul in sight of the claims of Jesus Christ, you know that your influence has been in the right direction, and instead of putting out a hand to prevent the throes, pray that they grow ten times stronger until there is no power on earth or in hell that can hold that soul away from Jesus Christ. Over and over again, we become amateur providences; we come in and prevent God, and say—‘This and that must not be.’ Instead of proving friends of the Bridegroom, we put our sympathy in the way, and the soul will one day say—‘That one was a thief, he stole my affections from Jesus, and I lost my vision of Him.’
Beware of rejoicing with a soul in the wrong thing, but see that you do rejoice in the right thing. “The friend of the Bridegroom … rejoiceth greatly because of the Bridegroom’s voice: this my joy therefore is fulfilled. He must increase, but I must decrease.” This is spoken with joy and not with sadness—at last they are to see the Bridegroom! And John says this is his joy. It is the absolute effacement of the worker, he is never thought of again.
Watch for all you are worth until you hear the Bridegroom’s voice in the life of another. Never mind what havoc it brings, what upsets, what crumblings of health, rejoice with divine hilarity when once His voice is heard. You may often see Jesus Christ wreck a life before He saves it. (Cf. Matt. 10:34.)


 Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year. Grand Rapids, MI: Oswald Chambers Publications; Marshall Pickering, 1986. Print.

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 24
She took for him an ark of bulrushes … and she laid it in the flags by the river’s brink
Exod. 2:3
The mother of Moses laid the ark in the flags by the river’s brink. Aye, but before doing so, she laid it on the heart of God! She could not have laid it so courageously upon the Nile, if she had not first devoutly laid it upon the care and love of God.
We are often surprised at the outward calmness of men who are called upon to do unpleasant and most trying deeds; but could we have seen them in secret, we should have known the moral preparation which they underwent before coming out to be seen by men. Be right in the sanctuary, if you would be right in the market place. Be steadfast in prayer if you would be calm in affliction. Start your race from the throne of God itself, if you would run well, and win the prize.
Joseph Parker


 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.