Lord's Day - Read: the Bible in One Year - ODB




                 Bible in a Year:
  • Judges 7:1–8:35
  •     Luke 5:1–16

Lord's Day - International KJV Sunday school Lesson

March 29
Lesson 5 (KJV)
Need for Just Leaders
Devotional Reading:Psalm 50:1–15
Background Scripture:Malachi 2; 3
Malachi 2:1–9
1 And now, O ye priests, this commandment is for you.
2 If ye will not hear, and if ye will not lay it to heart, to give glory unto my name, saith the Lord of hostsI will even send a curse upon you, and I will curse your blessings: yea, I have cursed them already, because ye do not lay it to heart.
3 Behold, I will corrupt your seed, and spread dung upon your faces, even the dung of your solemn feasts; and one shall take you away with it.
4 And ye shall know that have sent this commandment unto you, that my covenant might be with Levi, saith the Lord of hosts.
My covenant was with him of life and peace, and I gave them to him for the fear wherewith he feared me and was afraid before my name.
6 The law of truth was in his mouth, and iniquity was not found in his lips: he walked with me in peace and equity, and did turn many away from iniquity.
7 For the priest’s lips should keep knowledge, and they should seek the law at his mouth: for he is the messenger of the Lord of hosts.
8 But ye are departed out of the way; ye have caused many to stumble at the law; ye have corrupted the covenant of Levi, saith the Lord of hosts.
9 Therefore have I also made you contemptible and base before all the people, according as ye have not kept my ways, but have been partial in the law.
Malachi 3:5, 6
5 And I will come near to you to judgment, and I will be a swift witness against the sorcerers, and against the adulterers, and against false swearers, and against those that oppress the hireling in his wages, the widow, and the fatherless, and that turn aside the stranger from his right, and fear not me, saith the Lord of hosts.
6 For I am the LordI change not; therefore ye sons of Jacob are not consumed.
Key Verse
If ye will not hear, and if ye will not lay it to heart, to give glory unto my name, saith the Lord of hostsI will even send a curse upon you, and I will curse your blessings: yea, have cursed them already, because ye do not lay it to heart.Malachi 2:2
Justice and the Prophets
Unit 1: God Requires Justice
Lessons 1–5
Lesson Aims
After participating in this lesson, each learner will be able to:
1. Describe the conduct of the Judean priesthood of the late fifth century BC.
2. Explain why God held the priesthood to a high standard.
3. Create a plan to improve one aspect of his or her own priestly ministry (1 Peter 2:5).
Lesson Outline
Introduction
A. A Model for Leadership
B. Lesson Context
I. Failing the Call (Malachi 2:1–9)
A. Hear the Lord (vv. 1–4)
Take That!
B. Fear the Lord (vv. 5–7)
Reliable Delivery
C. Follow the Lord (vv. 8, 9)
II. Renewing the Call (Malachi 3:5, 6)
A. Trying Offenders (v. 5)
B. Unchanging God (v. 6)
Conclusion
A. “Familiarity Breeds Contempt”
B. Prayer
C. Thought to Remember
HOW TO SAY IT
Artaxerxes

Are-tuh-zerk-seez.

Levites

Lee-vites.

Levitical

Leh-vit-ih-kul.

Malachi

Mal-uh-kye.

Nehemiah

Nee-huh-my-uh.

Persia

Per-zhuh.

Shechem

Shee-kem or Shek-em.

Lord's Day - Christian Church's Lectionary's - Logos

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Lent
Fifth Sunday in Lent
Year A



Old Testament Ezekiel 37:1–14
Old Testament 2 Kings 4:18–37 (Supplemental)
Psalm Psalm 116
Psalm Psalm 115 (Supplemental)
New Testament Romans 8:11–19
Gospel John 11:17–27, 38–45



Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Lent
Fifth Sunday in Lent



Old Testament Exodus 3:1–15
Psalm Psalm 45
New Testament Hebrews 9:11–15
Gospel John 8:46–59

 Christian Worship One Year Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2009. Print.

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Lent
Fifth Sunday in Lent
Year A



Old Testament Ezekiel 37:1–14
Psalm Psalm 130 (UMH 848)
New Testament Romans 8:6–11
Gospel John 11:1–45

 Vanderbilt Divinity Library. United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2009. Print.

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Lent
Fifth Sunday in Lent



Old Testament Genesis 22:1–14
Psalm Psalm 43
Epistle Hebrews 9:11–15
Gospel (John 8:42–45) 46–59

 Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Concordia Publishing House, 2009. Print.

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Lent
Fifth Sunday in Lent
Year A



Old Testament Ezekiel 37:1–14
Psalm Psalm 130
Epistle Romans 8:1–11
Gospel John 11:1–45 (46–53) or John 11:17–27, 38–53

 Lutheran Service Book Three Year Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Concordia Publishing House, 2009. Print.

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Lent
Fifth Sunday in Lent
Year A



First Reading Ezekiel 37:1–14
Psalm Psalm 130
Second Reading Romans 8:6–11
Gospel John 11:1–45

 Episcopal Church (USA) Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2016. Print.

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Lent
Fifth Sunday in Lent
Year A



Psalm Psalm 130
First Reading Ezekiel 37:1–3 (4–10) 11–14
Second Reading Romans 6:16–23
Gospel (John 11:1–17) 18–44

 The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2010. Print.

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Passiontide
The Fifth Sunday in Lent or Passion Sunday



Epistle Hebrews 9:11–15
Gospel John 8:46–58

 Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1928) Sunday Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2016. Print.

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Lent
Fifth Sunday in Lent
Year A



Old Testament Ezekiel 37:1–14
Psalm Psalm 130
New Testament Romans 8:6–11
Gospel John 11:1–45

 Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2009. Print.

Lord's Day - Byzantine Lectionary's - Logos

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Triodion and Great Lent
Fifth Sunday of Great Lent or Sunday of Saint Mary of Egypt
Bright or Dark Vestments



Matins Gospel John 20:19–31 (42nd Sunday)
Epistle Hebrews 9:11–14
Gospel Mark 10:32–45


 Byzantine Lectionary (Gregorian). Faithlife; Bellingham, WA, 2015; 2015. Print.

Sun, Mar 29, 2020, (Mar 16, 2020) | Triodion and Great Lent
Fourth Sunday of Great Lent or Sunday of Saint John Climacus
Bright or Dark Vestments



Matins Gospel John 20:11–18 (41st Sunday)
Epistle Hebrews 6:13–20
Gospel Mark 9:17–31

 Byzantine Lectionary (Julian). Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2016. Print.

Sunday, March 29, 2020, | Triodion and Great Lent
Fourth Sunday of Great Lent or Sunday of Saint John Climacus
Bright or Dark Vestments



Matins Gospel John 20:11–18 (41st Sunday)
Epistle Hebrews 6:13–20
Gospel Mark 9:17–31

 Byzantine Lectionary (Revised Julian). Faithlife; Bellingham, WA, 2015; 2015. Print.

Lord's Day - Today's Scripture / Insight - ODB

Today's Scripture: John 15:5-8

Insight 

It’s important to consider the full revelation of God in Scripture when trying to understand the meaning of any passage. Jesus’ words in John 15:5, “Apart from me, you can do nothing,” are similar to Paul’s statements in Acts 17:28, “In him, we live and move and have our being,” and Colossians 1:17, “in him all things hold together.” All of these verses emphasize the necessity of Christ to our very existence.
In John 15:1-27, Jesus is speaking specifically to His followers. He’s talking about the fruit that comes from the branch connected to the vine. When Jesus says that without Him we can do nothing, He means that without the source of life—the vine—the branch can’t even produce a leaf or a flower, let alone the fruit that brings God honor.

Lord's Day - Today's Scripture Lesson - NKJV, Logos

Rev. Lynwood F. Mundy
John 15:5–8

“I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much (Hos. 14:8; [Gal. 5:22, 23]) fruit; for without Me you can do (2 Cor. 3:5nothing. 
6 If anyone does not abide in Me, (Matt. 3:10he is cast out as a branch and is withered; and they gather them and throw them into the fire, and they are burned. 
7 If you abide in Me, and My words (1 John 2:14abide in you, (John 14:13; 16:23you (NU omits you will) will ask what you desire, and it shall be done for you. 
8 (Ps. 22:23; [Matt. 5:16]; John 13:31; 17:4; [Phil. 1:11]; 1 Pet. 4:11By this My Father is glorified, that you bear much fruit; (John 8:31so you will be My disciples.

The New King James Version. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1982. Print.

Lord's Day - Reflect & Pray - ODB

Reflect & Pray

What does it mean for you to remain in Jesus? How has He equipped you to bear fruit for Him?
All-powerful God, empower me to remain in You and allow Your loving Word to yield good fruit in me.
To learn more about growing spiritually, visit christianuniversity.org/SF104.

Lord's Day - Weekend Devotions - Logos

March 29: Prayer and Hope for the Anxious
Numbers 33:1–49; 1 Corinthians 15:12–34; Psalm 28:1–9
Anxiety, depression, and fear aren’t part of the Christian life—or the ideal Christian life, anyway. But for those who struggle with these emotions, this tidy concept isn’t helpful or true. What is helpful is hope and belief in the midst of tumultuous emotion.
The writer of Psa 28 expresses deep anxiety, but even as he does this, he expresses trust in Yahweh: “To you, O Yahweh, I call. O my rock, do not be deaf to me. Or else, if you are silent to me, then I will become like those descending to the pit” (Psa 28:1). Though he feels like God is not listening, the psalmist doesn’t stop pursuing God. He worships and cries for help anyway. In contrast to the “workers of evil” who “do not regard the works of Yahweh, nor the work of his hands,” the psalmist puts all of his dependence and trust in Yahweh (Psa 28:3, 5).
Halfway through the psalm, the petition turns to praise when Yahweh answers his prayer. The psalmist realizes his confidence is in the right place: Blessed is Yahweh because he has heard the voice of my supplications” (Psa 28:6). Even [though] dark times and bleak circumstances, God is faithful. He is never far from us, though emotions might dictate otherwise. He will Shepherd them also and carry them always” (Psa 28:9). He saves, blesses, guides, and even carries us through all seasons.
We are saved not according to our own works, but the work of Christ. In the midst of struggle, we can be certain that we are experiencing salvation now, in part. And we can be “convinced of this same thing, that the one who began a good work in [us] will finish it until the day of Christ Jesus (Phil 1:6).
How are you trusting in God in the midst of struggle? How can you thoughtfully support someone who is suffering through a season like this?
Rebecca Van Noord


 Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.

Morning, March 29 Go To Evening Reading

“Though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered.”
Hebrews 5:8

We are told that the Captain of our salvation was made perfect through suffering, therefore we who are sinful, and who are far from being perfect, must not wonder if we are called to pass through suffering too. Shall the head be crowned with thorns, and shall the other members of the body be rocked upon the dainty lap of ease? Must Christ pass through seas of his own blood to win the crown, and are we to walk to heaven dryshod in silver slippers? No, our Master’s experience teaches us that suffering is necessary, and the true-born child of God must not escape it if he might. But there is one very comforting thought in the fact of Christ’s “being made perfect through suffering”—it is, that he can have complete sympathy with us. He is not [a] high priest that cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities.” In this sympathy of Christ, we find a sustaining power. One of the early martyrs said, “I can bear it all, for Jesus suffered, and he suffers in me now; he sympathizes with me, and this makes me strong.” Believer lay hold of this thought in all times of agony. Let the thought of Jesus strengthen you as you follow in his steps. Find a sweet support in his sympathy; and remember that, to suffer is [an honorable] thing—to suffer for Christ is glory. The apostles rejoiced that they were counted worthy to do this. Just so far as the Lord shall give us [the] grace to suffer for Christ, to suffer with Christ, just so far does he [honor] us. The jewels of a Christian are his afflictions. The regalia of the kings whom God hath anointed are their troubles, their sorrows, and their griefs. Let us not, therefore, shun being [honored]. Let us not turn aside from being exalted. Griefs exalt us, and troubles lift us up. “If we suffer, we shall also reign with him.”

Go To Morning Reading Evening, March 29

“I called him, but he gave me no answer.”
Song of Solomon 5:6

Prayer sometimes tarrieth, like a petitioner at the gate, until the King cometh forth to fill her bosom with the blessings which she seeketh. The Lord, when he hath given great faith, has been known to try it by long delayings. He has suffered his servants’ voices to echo in their ears as from a brazen sky. They have knocked at the golden gate, but it has remained immovable, as though it were rusted upon its hinges. Like Jeremiah, they have cried, “Thou hast covered thyself with a cloud, that our prayer should not pass through.” Thus have true saints continued long [inpatient] waiting without reply, not because their prayers were not vehement, nor because they were unaccepted, but because it so pleased him who is a Sovereign, and who gives according to his own pleasure. If it pleases him to bid our patience exercise itself, shall he not do as he wills with his own! Beggars must not be choosers either as to time, place, or form. But we must be careful not to take delays in prayer for denials: God’s long-dated bills will be punctually [honored]; we must not suffer Satan to shake our confidence in the God of truth by pointing to our unanswered prayers. Unanswered petitions are not unheard [of]. God keeps a file for our prayers—they are not blown away by the wind, they are treasured in the King’s archives. This is a registry in the court of heaven wherein every prayer is recorded. Tried believer, thy Lord hath a tear-bottle in which the costly drops of sacred grief are put away and a book in which thy holy groanings are numbered. By-and-by, thy suit shall prevail. Canst thou is not content to wait [for] a little? Will not thy Lord’s time be better than thy time? By-and-by he will comfortably appear, to thy soul’s joy, and make thee put away the sackcloth and ashes of long waiting, and put on the scarlet and fine linen of full fruition.

 Spurgeon, C. H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings. London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1896. Print.

March 29th
Our Lord’s surprise visits
Be ye, therefore, ready also. Luke 12:40.
The great need for the Christian worker is to be ready to face Jesus Christ at any and every turn. This is not easy, no matter what our experience is. The battle is not against sin or difficulties or circumstances, but against being so absorbed in work that we are not ready to face Jesus Christ at every turn. That is the one great need, not facing our belief, or our creed, or the question whether we are of any use, but to face Him.
Jesus rarely comes where we expect Him; He appears where we least expect Him, and always in the most illogical connections. The only way a worker can keep true to God is by being ready for the Lord’s surprise visits. It is not service that matters, but intense spiritual reality, expecting Jesus Christ at every turn. This will give our life the attitude of child-wonder which He wants it to have. If we are going to be ready for Jesus Christ, we have to stop being religious (that is, using religion as a higher kind of culture) and be spiritually real.
If you are looking off unto Jesus, avoiding the call of the religious age you live in, and setting your heart on what He wants, on thinking on His line, you will be called unpractical and dreamy; but when He appears in the burden and the heat of the day, you will be the only one who is ready. Trust no one, not even the finest saint who ever walked this earth, ignore him, if he hinders your sight of Jesus Christ.

 Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year. Grand Rapids, MI: Oswald Chambers Publications; Marshall Pickering, 1986. Print.

March 29
The path of the just is as the shining light, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day
Prov. 4:18
Have I begun this path of heavenly love and knowledge now? Am I progressing in it? Do I feel some dawnings of the heavenly light, earnests, and antepasts of the full day of glory? Let all God’s dealings serve to quicken me in my way. Let every affection it may please Him to send, be as the moving pillar—a cloud of old, beckoning me to move my tent onward, saying, “Arise ye and depart, for this is not your rest.” Let me be often standing now on faith’s lofty eminences, looking, for “the day of God—the rising sun which is to set no more in weeping clouds. Wondrous progression! How will all earth’s learning, its boasted acquirements and eagle-eyed philosophy sink into the lispings of very infancy in comparison with this manhood of knowledge! Heaven will be the true Excelsior,” its song, “a song of degrees,” Jesus leading His people from height to height of glory, and saying, as He said to Nathaniel, “Thou shall see greater things than these!”
Macduff

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.