Saturday, May 30, 2015

A Mans Do’s and don’t to His Fellow Brother’s and Sister’s


A Mans Do’s and don’t to His Fellow Brother’s and Sister’s

Romans 12:14-21

14 a  Command                          aBless those who persecute you;
    b  Command                          bless
    c   Command                          and do not curse.
15 a  Expansion                               bRejoice with those who rejoice, and
    b  Expansion                               weep with those who weep.
16 a  Expansion                               cBe of the same mind toward one another.
    b  Expansion                               dDo not set your mind on high things,
    c   Expansion                               but associate with the humble.
    d  Command                          Do not be wise in your own opinion.

17 a  Expansion                               eRepay no one evil for evil.
    b  Expansion                               fHave 5regard for good things in the sight of all men.
18 a  Condition (c)                               If it is possible,
        Supplied                                     as much as depends
    b  Manner (c)                                  on you,
    c   Expansion                               glive peaceably with all men.
19 a  Expansion                               Beloved, hdo not avenge yourselves,
    b  Expansion                               but rather give place to wrath;
    c   Reason                                       for it is written,
    d  Quotation                                        i“Vengeance is Mine, I will repay,”
    e  Quotation                                        says the Lord.
Therefore
20 b  Condition (c)                                   j“If your enemy is hungry,
    c   Implication                                  feed him;
    d  Condition                                        If he is thirsty,
    e  Implication                                  give him a drink;
    f   Reason                                           For in so doing you will heap coals of fire on his head.”

21 a  Command                          Do not be overcome by evil,
    b  Command                          but kovercome evil with good.[1]
14 a  Command                          aBless those who persecute you;
    b  Command                          bless
    c   Command                          and do not curse.
15 a  Expansion                               bRejoice with those who rejoice, and
    b  Expansion                               weep with those who weep.
16 a  Expansion                               cBe of the same mind toward one another.
    b  Expansion                               dDo not set your mind on high things,
    c   Expansion                               but associate with the humble.
    d  Command                          Do not be wise in your own opinion.

17 a   Expansion                                eRepay no one evil for evil.
    b   Expansion                                fHave 5regard for good things in the sight of all men.
18 a   Condition (c)                                 If it is possible,
        Supplied                                      as much as depends
    b   Manner (c)                                    on you,
    c   Expansion                                glive peaceably with all men.
19 a   Expansion                                Beloved, hdo not avenge yourselves,
    b   Expansion                                but rather give place to wrath;
    c   Reason                                        for it is written,
    d   Quotation                                         i“Vengeance is Mine, I will repay,”
    e   Quotation                                         says the Lord.
Therefore
20 b   Condition (c)                                     j“If your enemy is hungry,
    c   Implication                                  feed him;
    d   Condition                                          If he is thirsty,
    e   Implication                                    give him a drink;
    f   Reason                                            For in so doing you will heap coals of fire on his head.”

21 a   Command                            Do not be overcome by evil,
    b   Command                            but kovercome evil with good.



a [Matt. 5:44]; Luke 6:28; 1 Cor. 4:12
b [1 Cor. 12:26]
c Rom. 15:5; 2 Cor. 13:11; [Phil. 2:2; 4:2]; 1 Pet. 3:8
d Jer. 45:5
e [Matt. 5:39]; 1 Pet. 3:9
f 2 Cor. 8:21
5 Or Provide good
g Heb. 12:14
h Lev. 19:18
i Deut. 32:35; Ps. 94:1; 1 Thess. 4:6; Heb. 10:30
j 2 Kin. 6:22; Prov. 25:21, 22; [Matt. 5:44]; Luke 6:27
k [Rom. 12:1, 2]
[1] The New King James Version. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1982. Print.
a [Matt. 5:44]; Luke 6:28; 1 Cor. 4:12
b [1 Cor. 12:26]
c Rom. 15:5; 2 Cor. 13:11; [Phil. 2:2; 4:2]; 1 Pet. 3:8
d Jer. 45:5
e [Matt. 5:39]; 1 Pet. 3:9
f 2 Cor. 8:21
5 Or Provide good
g Heb. 12:14
h Lev. 19:18
i Deut. 32:35; Ps. 94:1; 1 Thess. 4:6; Heb. 10:30
j 2 Kin. 6:22; Prov. 25:21, 22; [Matt. 5:44]; Luke 6:27
k [Rom. 12:1, 2]

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour


May 30

  Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid
        Matt. 5:14

Lamps do not talk, but they do shine. A lighthouse sounds no drum, it beats no gong; and yet far over the waters its friendly spark is seen by the mariner. So let your actions shine out your religion. Let the main sermon of your life be illustrated by all your conduct.

Spurgeon


Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Connect the Testaments





May 30: In Season and Out of Season
1 Chronicles 26:1–27:34; 2 Timothy 4:1–8; Psalm 89:23–52

I like to operate when I feel like I’m in control. When I haven’t gathered enough information or I feel uncertain of my circumstances, it’s tempting to avoid making a decision or taking action.
Paul knew that this type of outlook was detrimental to Timothy’s ministry. He tells Timothy that regardless of his circumstances, he was required to act: “Preach the word, be ready in season and out of season, reprove, rebuke, exhort, with all patience and instruction” (2 Tim 4:2).
Paul uses the certainty of Christ’s return to motivate Timothy to stick to his task (2 Tim 4:1). Although Timothy experienced times when it was not always convenient for him to act on his calling, he had been admonished by Paul about the importance of the work they were doing together: their calling. He also knew the urgency of that calling. Christ’s return and the appearance of His kingdom was their motivation (2 Tim 4:1).
We can’t follow God only when the timing is right for us. We also can’t rely on our own strength. When doing God’s work, we can never plan well enough or anticipate all the potential kinks; our plans will never be foolproof. It’s not the mark of a Christian to be certain of how everything will play out in every circumstance. The mark of a Christian is reliance on Christ as Savior, God, and guide. Through the clear and calm and through the fog, we’re required to trust, act, and follow on the basis of our certainty in Jesus. Like Timothy and Paul, we must be certain of our standing in Christ and the coming of His kingdom. And that changes everything.
Whatever the task and in every circumstance, we’re required to simply follow Jesus. We are charged to act for the gospel now, regardless of whether it’s convenient.

How are you trusting in your own strength instead of Jesus’? How can you be ready in the right way, in every season?

REBECCA VAN NOORD


Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, May 30                                                 Go To Evening Reading

         “Take us the foxes, the little foxes that spoil the vines.”
         — Song of Solomon 2:15

A little thorn may cause much suffering. A little cloud may hide the sun. Little foxes spoil the vines; and little sins do mischief to the tender heart. These little sins burrow in the soul, and make it so full of that which is hateful to Christ, that he will hold no comfortable fellowship and communion with us. A great sin cannot destroy a Christian, but a little sin can make him miserable. Jesus will not walk with his people unless they drive out every known sin. He says, “If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love, even as I have kept my Father’s commandments and abide in his love.” Some Christians very seldom enjoy their Saviour’s presence. How is this? Surely it must be an affliction for a tender child to be separated from his father. Art thou a child of God, and yet satisfied to go on without seeing thy Father’s face? What! thou the spouse of Christ, and yet content without his company! Surely, thou hast fallen into a sad state, for the chaste spouse of Christ mourns like a dove without her mate, when he has left her. Ask, then, the question, what has driven Christ from thee? He hides his face behind the wall of thy sins. That wall may be built up of little pebbles, as easily as of great stones. The sea is made of drops; the rocks are made of grains: and the sea which divides thee from Christ may be filled with the drops of thy little sins; and the rock which has well nigh wrecked thy barque, may have been made by the daily working of the coral insects of thy little sins. If thou wouldst live with Christ, and walk with Christ, and see Christ, and have fellowship with Christ, take heed of “the little foxes that spoil the vines, for our vines have tender grapes.” Jesus invites you to go with him and take them. He will surely, like Samson, take the foxes at once and easily. Go with him to the hunting.
___________________________________________________________

Go To Morning Reading                                                Evening, May 30

         “That henceforth we should not serve sin.”
         — Romans 6:6

Christian, what hast thou to do with sin? Hath it not cost thee enough already? Burnt child, wilt thou play with the fire? What! when thou hast already been between the jaws of the lion, wilt thou step a second time into his den? Hast thou not had enough of the old serpent? Did he not poison all thy veins once, and wilt thou play upon the hole of the asp, and put thy hand upon the cockatrice’s den a second time? Oh, be not so mad! so foolish! Did sin ever yield thee real pleasure? Didst thou find solid satisfaction in it? If so, go back to thine old drudgery, and wear the chain again, if it delight thee. But inasmuch as sin did never give thee what it promised to bestow, but deluded thee with lies, be not a second time snared by the old fowler— be free, and let the remembrance of thy ancient bondage forbid thee to enter the net again! It is contrary to the designs of eternal love, which all have an eye to thy purity and holiness; therefore run not counter to the purposes of thy Lord. Another thought should restrain thee from sin. Christians can never sin cheaply; they pay a heavy price for iniquity. Transgression destroys peace of mind, obscures fellowship with Jesus, hinders prayer, brings darkness over the soul; therefore be not the serf and bondman of sin. There is yet a higher argument: each time you “serve sin” you have “Crucified the Lord afresh, and put him to an open shame.” Can you bear that thought? Oh! if you have fallen into any special sin during this day, it may be my Master has sent this admonition this evening, to bring you back before you have backslidden very far. Turn thee to Jesus anew; he has not forgotten his love to thee; his grace is still the same. With weeping and repentance, come thou to his footstool, and thou shalt be once more received into his heart; thou shalt be set upon a rock again, and thy goings shall be established.


Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings. Complete and unabridged; New modern edition. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2006. Print.

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest








May 30th

“Yes—But …!”



Lord, I will follow Thee; but … Luke 9:61.

Supposing God tells you to do something which is an enormous test to your common sense, what are you going to do? Hang back? If you get into the habit of doing a thing in the physical domain, you will do it every time until you break the habit determinedly; and the same is true spiritually. Again and again you will get up to what Jesus Christ wants, and every time you will turn back when it comes to the point, until you abandon resolutely. ‘Yes, but—supposing I do obey God in this matter, what about …?’ ‘Yes, I will obey God if He will let me use my common sense, but don’t ask me to take a step in the dark.’ Jesus Christ demands of the man who trusts Him the same reckless sporting spirit that the natural man exhibits. If a man is going to do anything worth while, there are times when he has to risk everything on his leap, and in the spiritual domain Jesus Christ demands that you risk everything you hold by common sense and leap into what He says, and immediately you do, you find that what He says fits on as solidly as common sense. At the bar of common sense Jesus Christ’s statements may seem mad; but bring them to the bar of faith, and you begin to find with awestruck spirit that they are the words of God. Trust entirely in God, and when He brings you to the venture, see that you take it. We act like pagans in a crisis, only one out of a crowd is daring enough to bank his faith in the character of God.


May 31st

God first



Put God First in Trust. Jesus did not commit Himself unto them, … for He knew what was in man. John 2:24–25 .

Our Lord trusted no man; yet He was never suspicious, never bitter, never in despair about any man because He put God first in trust; He trusted absolutely in what God’s grace could do for any man. If I put my trust in human beings first, I will end in despairing of everyone; I will become bitter, because I have insisted on man being what no man ever can be—absolutely right. Never trust anything but the grace of God in yourself or in anyone else.


Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year. Grand Rapids, MI: Oswald Chambers Publications; Marshall Pickering, 1986. Print.