Saturday, July 23, 2016

The KJV Standard Lesson Sunday School Lesson, Outline





July 24
Lesson 8
UNWAVERING HOPE

DEVOTIONAL READING: Psalm 42
BACKGROUND SCRIPTURE: Romans 5:1–11



ROMANS 5:1–11

1 Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ:
2 By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.
3 And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience;
4 And patience, experience; and experience, hope:
5 And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.
6 For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly.
7 For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die.
8 But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.
9 Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.
10 For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.
11 And not only so, but we also joy in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have now received the atonement.

Photo: isovar/iStock/Thinkstock

KEY VERSE
Hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.
—Romans 5:5

TOWARD A NEW CREATION

Unit 3: Life on God’s Terms
LESSONS 8–13


LESSON AIMS

After participating in this lesson, each learner will be able to:
1. Give reasons why Christians have unapologetic, unashamed hope.
2. Explain the relationship between justification and the believer’s expressions of faith, peace, and love.
3. Write a poem, song, or other expressions of joy to celebrate the receiving of reconciliation through our Lord Jesus Christ.


LESSON OUTLINE

Introduction
      A.      Stuck in the Snow
      B.      Lesson Background
          I.      Unashamed Hope (ROMANS 5:1–5)
      A.      Result: Peace with God (vv. 1, 2)
      Access, Granted and Denied
      B.      Result: Gift of the Spirit (vv. 3–5)
          II.      Unearned Salvation (ROMANS 5:6–11)
      A.      Basis: Christ’s Death (vv. 6, 7)
      B.      Basis: God’s Love (vv. 8, 9)
      C.      Basis: Christ’s Resurrection (vv. 10, 11)
      Reconciled, Saved
Conclusion
      A.      Proven Love
      B.      Prayer
      C.      Thought to Remember



HOW TO SAY IT

Bathsheba   Bath-she-buh.
Corinth   Kor-inth.
Habakkuk   Huh-back-kuk.
Leviticus   Leh-vit-ih-kus.
patriarch   pay-tree-ark.
Pentecost   Pent-ih-kost.
shalom (Hebrew)   shah-lome.

___________________

 What Do You Think?
     In what ways does having peace with God affect the way you live daily? How should it?
 Talking Points for Your Discussion
     ■      At home
     ■      At work/school
     ■      When traveling
     ■      Other
___________________


What Do You Think?
     What have been some personal costs to you in following Christ? How do you deal with the sense of loss that these costs entail?
 Talking Points for Your Discussion
     ■      Regarding costs in relationships
     ■      Regarding costs of career opportunities
     ■      Regarding financial costs
     ■      Other
___________________

 What Do You Think?
     What connections do you experience between having the Holy Spirit and having love in your heart toward others?
 Talking Points for Your Discussion
     ■      When the Holy Spirit seems active in your life
     ■      When the Holy Spirit seems inactive in your life
___________________

Visual for Lesson 8. Point to this visual as you ask learners how hope relates to the other eight concepts noted.
___________________


 What Do You Think?
     What can we do to put aside the felt need to “even the accounts” with other people?
 Talking Points for Your Discussion
     ■      At work
     ■      In marriage
     ■      With a sibling
     ■      On the freeway
     ■      Other
___________________


Krause, Mark S., James B. North, and Cheryl Frey. “Unwavering Hope.” The KJV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2015–2016. Ed. Ronald L. Nickelson and Jim Eichenberger. Vol. 63. Cincinnati, OH: Standard Publishing, 2015. 407. Print.



The KJV Standard Lesson Sunday School Lesson, Outline





July 24
Lesson 8
UNWAVERING HOPE

DEVOTIONAL READING: Psalm 42
BACKGROUND SCRIPTURE: Romans 5:1–11



ROMANS 5:1–11

1 Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ:
2 By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.
3 And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience;
4 And patience, experience; and experience, hope:
5 And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.
6 For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly.
7 For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die.
8 But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.
9 Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.
10 For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.
11 And not only so, but we also joy in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have now received the atonement.

Photo: isovar/iStock/Thinkstock

KEY VERSE
Hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.
—Romans 5:5

TOWARD A NEW CREATION

Unit 3: Life on God’s Terms
LESSONS 8–13


LESSON AIMS

After participating in this lesson, each learner will be able to:
1. Give reasons why Christians have unapologetic, unashamed hope.
2. Explain the relationship between justification and the believer’s expressions of faith, peace, and love.
3. Write a poem, song, or other expressions of joy to celebrate the receiving of reconciliation through our Lord Jesus Christ.


LESSON OUTLINE

Introduction
      A.      Stuck in the Snow
      B.      Lesson Background
          I.      Unashamed Hope (ROMANS 5:1–5)
      A.      Result: Peace with God (vv. 1, 2)
      Access, Granted and Denied
      B.      Result: Gift of the Spirit (vv. 3–5)
          II.      Unearned Salvation (ROMANS 5:6–11)
      A.      Basis: Christ’s Death (vv. 6, 7)
      B.      Basis: God’s Love (vv. 8, 9)
      C.      Basis: Christ’s Resurrection (vv. 10, 11)
      Reconciled, Saved
Conclusion
      A.      Proven Love
      B.      Prayer
      C.      Thought to Remember



HOW TO SAY IT

Bathsheba   Bath-she-buh.
Corinth   Kor-inth.
Habakkuk   Huh-back-kuk.
Leviticus   Leh-vit-ih-kus.
patriarch   pay-tree-ark.
Pentecost   Pent-ih-kost.
shalom (Hebrew)   shah-lome.

___________________

 What Do You Think?
     In what ways does having peace with God affect the way you live daily? How should it?
 Talking Points for Your Discussion
     ■      At home
     ■      At work/school
     ■      When traveling
     ■      Other
___________________


What Do You Think?
     What have been some personal costs to you in following Christ? How do you deal with the sense of loss that these costs entail?
 Talking Points for Your Discussion
     ■      Regarding costs in relationships
     ■      Regarding costs of career opportunities
     ■      Regarding financial costs
     ■      Other
___________________

 What Do You Think?
     What connections do you experience between having the Holy Spirit and having love in your heart toward others?
 Talking Points for Your Discussion
     ■      When the Holy Spirit seems active in your life
     ■      When the Holy Spirit seems inactive in your life
___________________

Visual for Lesson 8. Point to this visual as you ask learners how hope relates to the other eight concepts noted.
___________________


 What Do You Think?
     What can we do to put aside the felt need to “even the accounts” with other people?
 Talking Points for Your Discussion
     ■      At work
     ■      In marriage
     ■      With a sibling
     ■      On the freeway
     ■      Other
___________________


Krause, Mark S., James B. North, and Cheryl Frey. “Unwavering Hope.” The KJV Standard Lesson Commentary, 2015–2016. Ed. Ronald L. Nickelson and Jim Eichenberger. Vol. 63. Cincinnati, OH: Standard Publishing, 2015. 407. Print.



Connect the Testaments





July 23: Finding God in Sheol
2 Samuel 11:1–12:31; 2 Peter 1:1–8; Psalm 139:1–24

We’ve all felt distant from God. Sometimes it’s sin that makes us feel separated from Him; other times it could be a lack of prayer. Either way, when we feel apart from God, God has not moved away from us. God never moves—we do. But we can find solace in the words of Psa 139: “O Yahweh, you have searched me, and you know me. You know my sitting down and my rising up. You understand my thought from afar” (Psa 139:1–2).

We spend so much of life explaining ourselves to others. Trying to manage perceptions is a norm in our society—especially for those of us in fast-paced work environments. There’s nothing wrong with this as long as our motives are pure, we’re being honest, and we’re not obsessed with what others think. But it’s certainly comforting to know that with God, we never have to explain ourselves. He already knows. He has already searched us—and He is always present.

The psalmist writes, “You barricade me behind and in front, and set your hand upon me.… If I ascend to heaven, there you are, and if I make my bed in Sheol [the ultimate symbol of darkness in the Ancient Near East], look! There you are. If I lift up the wings of the dawn, and I alight on the far side of the sea, even there your hand would lead me, and your right hand would hold me fast” (Psa 139:5, 8–10). God is in all places. We may accept these concepts intellectually, but our minds become distracted when we’re feeling alone. Loneliness is heart work, as Psa 139 portrays.

Psalm 139 concludes with the words, “Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. And see if there is in me the worship of false gods, and lead me in the way everlasting” (Psa 139:23–24). The God who created the universe is waiting for us. He is ready to find our false gods and cast them out. He is ready to help us acknowledge His work of goodness and order in the world, and to alleviate the anxiousness we feel. Only He who is all-knowing and all-present can bring us ultimate comfort. Only He can close the gap we feel.

What false gods are you fighting? What anxiousness do you need to ask God to cast out?

JOHN D. BARRY


Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.

Morning and Evening








Morning, July 23                                        Go To Evening Reading

         “Even thou wast as one of them.”
         —Obadiah 1:11

Brotherly kindness was due from Edom to Israel in the time of need, but instead thereof, the men of Esau made common cause with Israel’s foes. Special stress in the sentence before us is laid upon the word thou; as when Caesar cried to Brutus, “and thou Brutus”; a bad action may be all the worse, because of the person who has committed it. When we sin, who are the chosen favourites of heaven, we sin with an emphasis; ours is a crying offence, because we are so peculiarly indulged. If an angel should lay his hand upon us when we are doing evil, he need not use any other rebuke than the question, “What thou? What dost thou here?” Much forgiven, much delivered, much instructed, much enriched, much blessed, shall we dare to put forth our hand unto evil? God forbid!

A few minutes of confession may be beneficial to thee, gentle reader, this morning. Hast thou never been as the wicked? At an evening party certain men laughed at uncleanness, and the joke was not altogether offensive to thine ear, even thou wast as one of them. When hard things were spoken concerning the ways of God, thou wast bashfully silent; and so, to on-lookers, thou wast as one of them. When world-lings were bartering in the market, and driving hard bargains, wast thou not as one of them? When they were pursuing vanity with a hunter’s foot, were thou not as greedy for gain as they were? Could any difference be discerned between thee and them? Is there any difference? Here we come to close quarters. Be honest with thine own soul, and make sure that thou art a new creature in Christ Jesus; but when this is sure, walk jealously, lest any should again be able to say, “Even thou wast as one of them.” Thou wouldst not desire to share their eternal doom, why then be like them here? Come not thou into their secret, lest thou come into their ruin. Side with the afflicted people of God, and not with the world.
______________________________________________________

Go To Morning Reading                                         Evening, July 23

         “The blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin.”
         —1 John 1:7

“Cleanse,” says the text—not “shall cleanse.” There are multitudes who think that as a dying hope they may look forward to pardon. Oh! how infinitely better to have cleansing now than to depend on the bare possibility of forgiveness when I come to die. Some imagine that a sense of pardon is an attainment only obtainable after many years of Christian experience. But forgiveness of sin is a present thing—a privilege for this day, a joy for this very hour. The moment a sinner trusts Jesus he is fully forgiven. The text, being written in the present tense, also indicates continuance; it was “cleanseth” yesterday, it is “cleanseth” to-day, it will be “cleanseth” tomorrow: it will be always so with you, Christian, until you cross the river; every hour you may come to this fountain, for it cleanseth still. Notice, likewise, the completeness of the cleansing, “The blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin”—not only from sin, but “from all sin.” Reader, I cannot tell you the exceeding sweetness of this word, but I pray God the Holy Ghost to give you a taste of it. Manifold are our sins against God. Whether the bill be little or great, the same receipt can discharge one as the other. The blood of Jesus Christ is as blessed and divine a payment for the transgressions of blaspheming Peter as for the shortcomings of loving John; our iniquity is gone, all gone at once, and all gone for ever. Blessed completeness! What a sweet theme to dwell upon as one gives himself to sleep.

         “Sins against a holy God;
         Sins against his righteous laws;
         Sins against his love, his blood;
         Sins against his name and cause;
         Sins immense as is the sea-
         From them all he cleanseth me.”



Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings. Complete and unabridged; New modern edition. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 2006. Print.

My Utmost for His Highest








July 23rd

Sanctification



Of Him are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us … sanctification. 1 Cor. 1:30.

The Life Side. The mystery of sanctification is that the perfections of Jesus Christ are imparted to me, not gradually, but instantly when by faith I enter into the realization that Jesus Christ is made unto me sanctification. Sanctification does not mean anything less than the holiness of Jesus being made mine manifestly.

The one marvellous secret of a holy life lies not in imitating Jesus, but in letting the perfections of Jesus manifest themselves in my mortal flesh. Sanctification is “Christ in you.” It is His wonderful life that is imparted to me in sanctification and imparted by faith as a sovereign gift of God’s grace. Am I willing for God to make sanctification as real in me as it is in His word?

Sanctification means the impartation of the holy qualities of Jesus Christ. It is His patience, His love, His holiness, His faith, His purity, His godliness, that is manifested in and through every sanctified soul. Sanctification is not drawing from Jesus the power to be holy; it is drawing from Jesus the holiness that was manifested in Him, and He manifests it in me. Sanctification is an impartation, not an imitation. Imitation is on a different line. In Jesus Christ is the perfection of everything, and the mystery of sanctification is that all the perfections of Jesus are at my disposal, and slowly and surely I begin to live a life of ineffable order and sanity and holiness “Kept by the power of God.”


Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year. Grand Rapids, MI: Oswald Chambers Publications; Marshall Pickering, 1986. Print.

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour








July 23

  Blessed is the man … that keepeth the Sabbath
        Isa 56:2

The Sabbath is the savings-bank of human life, into which we deposit one day in seven to be repaid in the autumn of life with compound interest.

Selected


Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.