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Showing posts from November 2, 2014

Revised Common Lectionary

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 | AFTER PENTECOST
PROPER 26
YEAR A
On the same date: All Saints (Observed)


Old Testament & Psalm, Option I
Old TestamentJoshua 3:7–17
             Psalm       Psalm 107:1–7, 33–37
  or

Old Testament & Psalm, Option II
Old Testament Micah 3:5–12
             Psalm       Psalm 43

New Testament1 Thessalonians 2:9–13
GospelMatthew 23:1–12


Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 | AFTER PENTECOST
PROPER 26
YEAR A

Old TestamentJoshua 3:7–17
             Psalm       Psalm 107:1–7, 33–37 (UMH 830)
New Testament1 Thessalonians 2:9–13
GospelMatthew 23:1–12


Vanderbilt Divinity Library. United Methodist Revised Common Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2009. Print.

The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2014 | AFTER PENTECOST
PROPER 26
YEAR A
On the same date: All Saints’ Day(Observed)

Psalm       Psalm 43
             First Reading       Micah 3:5–12
             Second Reading       1 Thessalonians 2:9–13, 17–20
Gospel Matthew 23:1–12


The Episcopal Church. Book of Common Prayer (1979) Sunday Lectionary. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010. Print.

Connect the Testaments: A Daily Devotional

November 2: Will We Follow?
1 Kings 2:1–46;Mark 1:35–2:28; Proverbs 1:8–12

The Gospel ofMark opens without fanfare—certainly nothing befitting literary greatness. There is no lofty imagery like the Gospel of John, no impressive genealogies like the Gospel of Matthew, and no historical narrative like the Gospel ofLuke. Instead, Mark flashes rapidly through events that build on one another. John the Baptist’s prophecy is followed by short summaries of Jesus’ baptism andHis temptation by Satan. After calling His first disciples, Jesus begins healing and preaching both near and far—all within the first chapter. The unadorned, clipped prose communicates something urgent.

Mark’s narrative captures the coming kingdom that will erupt with a power only some can see. It imparts a sense of urgency to those who know they are needy.

Mark portrays the advancing kingdom through the person and work of Jesus, who draws people. The crowds at Capernaum seek Him out (Mark 2:2), as do those marginalized by…