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Showing posts from April 26, 2016

Robinson’s Arch

Robinson’s Arch
‎Arch supporting staircase of Robinson’s Arch

Women’s Role According to Paul

Women’s Role According to Paul

Excerpt


Under the gospel, prayer is not to be confined to any one particular house of prayer, but men must pray every where. We must pray in our closets, pray in our families, pray at our meals, pray when we are on journeys, and pray in the solemn assemblies, whether more public or private. We must pray in charity; without wrath, or malice, or anger at any person. We must pray in faith, without doubting, and without disputing. Women who profess the Christian religion must be modest in apparel, not affecting gaudiness, gaiety, or costliness. Good works are the best ornament; these are, in the sight of God, of great price. Modesty and neatness are more to be consulted in garments than elegance and fashion. And it would be well if the professors of serious godliness were wholly free from vanity in dress. They should spend more time and money in relieving the sick and distressed, than in decorating themselves and their children. To do this in a manner unsuitab…

God Makes a Covenant with Abram (Genesis 15:1–21)

God Makes a Covenant with Abram (Genesis 15:1–21)

Chapter 15 consists of a series of dialogues or conversations between God and Abram in which the narrator pauses at certain points to address the reader or to describe events. The chapter is divided into two parts. In the first part, God promises Abram a son and many descendants (verses 1–6). In the second God promises Abram the land (verses 15:7–21).

In the first section. God is the speaker in verses 1, 4, and 5; and Abram is the speaker in verses 2 and 3. The narrator closes the first episode by addressing the reader in verse 6. In the second episode God speaks in verses 7, 9, 13, 14, 15, and 16, and Abram in verse 8. In verses 10, 11, and 12, the narrator describes for the reader what Abram does and what happens to him. Beginning with verse 13 and continuing through verse 16, the action is interrupted as God foretells what will happen to Abram’s descendants and how he will die. The narrator then concludes the account by picking up th…

Grace Bestowed on All

Grace Bestowed on All

Romans 12:6

Excerpt


The gift each believer has received is the result of the gracious outpouring of God’s blessing on the church (v. 6). Berger writes: “The various charismata are understood as concrete manifestations of the one grace bestowed on all.”


Mounce, Robert H. Romans. Vol. 27. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1995. Print. The New American Commentary.

Gateway, Damascus

Gateway, Damascus
‎On the 13th of May, 1894, our caravan passed through the gateway in the western wall of the city of Damascus, and we found ourselves in the midst of this most remarkable city. For hours before we reached it we saw its gleaming glory in the distance; the tall, graceful minarets rising from her more than three hundred mosques; her far-famed gardens and the glory of her trees. Perhaps one of the reasons why travelers praise Damascus so unstintingly is because of the delightful contrast it furnishes to the treeless, hot and verdureless country through which they passed on their approach to it. After a horseback ride from Jerusalem over a rough road—perhaps one of the roughest on earth—through a country with few trees, one would be in condition to praise any city in which gardens, orchards and abundance of water were to be found; but when the contrast is presented between such a desert journey and the surpassing beauty of Damascus, one is justified for the measure of ex…

Thessalonica Arches

Thessalonica Arches

‎Ancient stone arches in Thessalonica.

Tetradrachma of Mithradates II of Pontus

Tetradrachma of Mithradates II of Pontus
‎In 291 B.C. Mithradates, I founded Pontus, a kingdom along the Black Sea’s south coast. This silver coin portrays Mithridates II, whose reign, though impossible to firmly date, probably extended from about 240 to 185 B.C. The name Mithridates, occurring twice in the Bible (Ezra 1:8, Ezra 4:7), means “gift of Mithra,” Persian god of covenants. The Roman Republic conquered Pontus in 63 B.C., including it in the province of Bithynia and Pontus. Jews from Pontus were at the Pentecost celebration in Acts 2:9. ‎Ezra 1:8, Ezra 4:7, Acts 2:9, Acts 18:2, 1 Pet 1:1

Connect the Testaments

April 26: Bitter and Betrayed
Joshua 16:1–17:18; 2 Corinthians 11:24–33; Psalm 55

The betrayal of a loved one can shake our world. It can make us feel vulnerable and used, and if we’re not careful, it can cause us to be bitter and suspicious toward others. The psalmist in Psalm 55 experiences such a betrayal from a friend who feared God: “We would take sweet counsel together in the house of God” (Psa 55:14).

The psalmist agonizes over how he was deceived: “The buttery words of his mouth were smooth, but there was trouble in his heart. His words were smoother than oil, but they were drawn swords” (Psa 55:21). How does someone move beyond a violation of trust? Instead of growing bitter, the psalmist puts his trust in Yahweh: “Cast your burden on Yahweh, and he will sustain you. He will never allow the righteous to be moved” (Psa 55:22).

Similarly, in 2 Corinthians, Paul tells the church in Corinth about his sufferings. Among Paul’s lashings, stonings, shipwrecks (three of them), and robb…

Morning and Evening

Morning, April 26      Go To Evening Reading
 “This do in remembrance of me.”  — 1 Corinthians 11:24
It seems then, that Christians may forget Christ! There could be no need for this loving exhortation if there were not a fearful supposition that our memories might prove treacherous. Nor is this a bare supposition: it is, alas! too well confirmed in our experience, not as a possibility, but as a lamentable fact. It appears almost impossible that those who have been redeemed by the blood of the dying Lamb, and loved with an everlasting love by the eternal Son of God, should forget that gracious Saviour; but, if startling to the ear, it is, alas! too apparent to the eye to allow us to deny the crime. Forget him who never forgot us! Forget him who poured his blood forth for our sins! Forget him who loved us even to the death! Can it be possible? Yes, it is not only possible, but conscience confesses that it is too sadly a fault with all of us, that we suffer him to be as a wayfaring man …

My Utmost for His Highest

April 26th
The supreme climb


Take now thy son, … and offer him there for a burnt-offering upon one of the mountains which I will tell thee of. Genesis 22:2.

Character determines how a man interprets God’s will (cf. Psalm 18:25–26 ). Abraham interpreted God’s command to mean that he had to kill his son, and he could only leave this tradition behind by the pain of a tremendous ordeal. God could purify his faith in no other way. If we obey what God says according to our sincere belief, God will break us from those traditions that misrepresent Him. There are many such beliefs to be got rid of, e.g., that God removes a child because the mother loves him too much—a devil’s lie! and a travesty of the true nature of God. If the devil can hinder us from taking the supreme climb and getting rid of wrong traditions about God, he will do so; but if we keep true to God, God will take us through an ordeal which will bring us out into a better knowledge of Himself.

The great point of Abraham’s fait…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

April 26

  Consider how great things he hath done for you
1 Sam. 12:24
Look back on all the way the Lord your God has led you. Do you not see it dotted with ten thousand blessings in disguise? Call to mind the needed succor sent at the critical moment: the right way chosen for you, instead of the wrong way you had chosen for yourself; the hurtful thing to which your heart so fondly clung, removed out of your path; the breathing-time granted, which your tried and struggling spirit just at the moment needed. Oh, has not Jesus stood at your side when you knew it not? Has not Infinite Love encircled every event with its everlasting arms and gilded every cloud with its merciful lining? Oh, retrace your steps, and mark His footprint in each one! Thank Him for them all, and learn the needed lesson of leaning more simply on Jesus.

F. Whitfield

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.