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Death

Death

Excerpt
In the NT, death is seen more as a theological problem than as a personal event. Death goes beyond the simple ending of physical life, which the authors accept almost without difficulty. Death is seen as affecting every part of a person’s life. God alone is immortal, the source of all life in the world (Rom 4:171 Tm 6:16). Only as human beings are properly related to God’s life can they live, but it has been unnatural for people to be in personal communion with the divine source of life since sin was introduced into the world (Rom 5:1217–181 Cor 15:22). When Adam separated himself from God, that separation brought death. Each human being has followed in Adam’s footsteps (Rom 3:235:12), bringing death for everyone as the absolutely necessary result (Rom 6:23Heb 9:27). Death, then, is not merely something that happens to people at the end of their lives; it is also the living out of their lives apart from fellowship with God. More
Elwell, Walter A., and Philip Wesley Comfort. Tyndale Bible dictionary 2001: 367. Print. Tyndale Reference Library.
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