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Simeon

Simeon

Excerpt
A man in Jerusalem who was righteous and devout and who was looking for ‘the consolation of Israel’ (Lk. 2:25–35). He is not to be identified with Rabbi Simon ben Hillel. He was one of the remnants who was longing for the coming of the Messiah and had received a direct revelation that he would not die before seeing the Messiah with his own eyes. When the presentation of Jesus was about to take place he was guided by the Spirit to come into the Temple. On seeing Jesus he uttered the hymn of praise now known as the *Nunc Dimittis. He saw that the Messiah would vindicate Israel in the eyes of the Gentiles. Simeon went on to speak to the astonished Mary of the role of Christ within Israel. He was to be like a stone causing some to fall and some to rise. He was to be a sign which would not be needed but spoken against (34). Her own suffering as she watched his life and death was to be acute and he was to reveal the inmost thoughts of men (35). Having given his testimony to the Christ, Simeon fades silently from the picture. More
Nixon, R. E. “Simeon.” Ed. D. R. W. Wood et al. New Bible Dictionary 1996: 1103. Print.
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