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The 90/10 Principle

The 90/10 Principle

Excerpt
‎While I have gained more insight into how I am wired, at mid-life, I have had to face another reality. I prefer to work out of my giftedness, to concentrate my efforts only in areas of ability and interest. But ministry often falls under the 90/10 principle: 90 percent of what I do is what I must do in order to get to do the 10 percent I love to do. For example, I love to preach. The thirty minutes I communicate God’s Word on Sunday are most often pure ecstasy. But wrangling with a board or putting out a church fire, which can consume inordinate amounts of time, drains me. I have often wished I could preach 90 percent of the time. … More
Fenton, Gary. Your Ministry’s next Chapter. Vol. 8. Minneapolis, MN: Bethany House Publishers, 1999. Print. The Pastor’s Soul Series.
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