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I AM THINE, O LORD

August 1


I AM THINE, O LORDFanny J. Crosby, 1820–1915
  Let us draw near to God with a sincere heart in full assurance of faith. (Hebrews 10:22)

Each new day requires a fresh renewal of our dedication to the Lord. The strongest of Christians can be drawn away by the pressures of daily living. And we are vulnerable to the lusts of the flesh and the eyes as well as the subtle temptations that constitute the “pride of life” (1 John 2:16). The warning of Scripture is clear: “Let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall” (1 Corinthians 10:12). God must always have His rightful place on the throne of the heart. Nothing in life—not job, not recreation, not even family—should have the top priority of our daily concerns. Anything that replaces the Lordship of Christ can become idolatrous and cause us to be susceptible to a spiritual disaster. We must each day say, “I am Thine, O Lord.”


Fanny Crosby wrote this consecration hymn while visiting in the home of the composer of the music,…

Finding Happiness

Aug. 1


Finding Happiness


Matthew 5:3

“Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.”

Jesus said, “Blessed are the poor in spirit.” Don’t confuse being poor in spirit with being poor. Woody Allen says, “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons.” (http://www.freshsermonillustrations.net)

Jean Chatsky, a columnist for Money magazine, conducted a poll and discovered “that money makes folks happier if their family’s income is below $30,000 a year.” But once they able to meet their basic material needs, she found that “more money doesn’t equate to more happiness.” (http://www.freshsermonillustrations.net)

That makes sense. If a person doesn’t have their basic needs met, it is unlikely that they will be happy. But that doesn’t mean that money buys happiness, “People tend to crave more money and more things to restore that peak of good feeling—only to adapt to those pleasures and seek the next high—an addictive phenomenon that economists have labeled the …